Thursday, May 05, 2005

 

Above the Fold

Since Commando was unable to stomach the SAEN today, let's let him know that each of his predictions were accurate regarding the biased content. What a surprise.

Oh, and Commando: you thought the subhead would read "Blood flows like a river", but they actually got much more creatively graphic: "Blood coats the streets".

But let's talk placement. An article on the latest in a long string of suicide bombings of Iraqi civilians is on the left side of the front page, covering space eight inches long and two inches wide. An article on the capture of the third ranking al-Qaida terrorist - a much more important and newsworthy event - is on the right side of the front page, with a lead measuring 6 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches. The lead portions of the two articles are roughly the same area. So, does that mean they have treated the stories equally?

Of course not. The negative headline "Carnage continues across Iraq" is "above the fold" and the positive headline "Al-Qaida's No. 3 Bagged in Pakistan" is "below the fold".
The phrase "above the fold" refers to the location of an important news story or photograph on the front page of a newspaper. Most papers are delivered and displayed to customers folded up, meaning that only the top half of the front page is visible. Thus, an item that is "above the fold" is usually one that the editor feels will entice people to buy the paper.
So, here we have documentation of SAEN bias in their reporting on the war on terrorism. Two articles, filling the same space, one positive and one negative. Given a completely free editing choice, which one did the editor decide to place "above the fold"? Do you agree that the reporting of yet another suicide bombing in Iraq is more newsworthy than the capture of the 3rd-ranked member of Al-Qaida?

If so, Bob Rivard has a job for you.
Comments:
The Amazing Swami Commando sees and knows all!
 
But let's talk placement. An article on the latest in a long string of suicide bombings of Iraqi civilians is on the left side of the front page

This isn't just another bombing. It took place in a Kurdish city that had been relatively violence-free, making it an especially noteworthy event. Moreover, its placement is appropriate. The headline is above the fold, but not the article. Flipping the paper to read the article would lead one to see the right-side article on the al-Qaida operative's capture. In fact, the England story is the paper's lead for the day, as Commando predicted.
Gregg
 
Great job guys. Glad to see that the Alamo City has someone watching over its local media to ensure that things stay fair and balanced. Keep up the good work!
 
Gregg and Duncan, thanks for your comments and thanks for reading SAEN Watch. Have a good one!

--Commando
 
Flipping the paper to read the article would lead one to see the right-side article on the al-Qaida operative's capture.

But, Gregg, I could say the same thing if it was the positive headline that had been selected to be above the fold.

So we're back where we started: a free choice by the SAEN editor to put one or the other article above the fold. They chose the negative headline. Based on the documentation chronicled in this blog, we can be confident they will ALWAYS accentuate the negative on this issue, when they have the option.
 
Hi Blogger. There are not too many good promotional programs and promotional programs related sites that aren't full of junk posts, search engine scraping and except for keyword stuffing, nothing useful related to promotional programs. It was nice to find an exception today when I happened upon your site. Keep it going.
 
Blogger, I just happened to be surfing for sales leads and mailing lists and sales leads and mailing lists related sites and somehow ended here. Don't ask me how. I actually wasn't interested in this post until I accidentally got here and started reading. Got major sidetracked. - But that's ok! Well, best of luck and I'm back off looking for info on sales leads and mailing lists.
 
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